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In The Rabbit Hole Urban Survival

discusses survival, preparedness, guns, tactical, urban homesteading, personal safety, food storage, gear reviews, and other topics with ACTIONABLE information every Monday with a comedic twist and NO TIGHT TINFOIL HATS.
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 27, 2017

In this episode, Aaron goes back to basics with a short episode on the trio of bags for survival: Bug-out bags, car bags, and EDC Bags. A Bug-out bag is where new peppers tend to focus their early attention.

And they tend to end up looking like something equipped for the zombie apocalypse. But bug-out bags should be much more straightforward. They are intended to allow you fast eagles and sustain you for up to 72-hours.

Your EDC Bag, on the other hand, is the bag you should devote most of your attention. It's the bag:

  • You're most likely to have with you when something goes wrong
  • Is used the most
  • And must be carefully considered due to the restrictions on size and weight

And next in priority is the car bag: A mini-bug-out bag intended to get you back home.

Note: The items in bags for survival are very personal. This episode does not contain an exhaustive list. But it is intended to get you thinking about the right way to view and work with these types of bags.

Bags for Survival Topics Discussed:

  • Bug-out Bags

    • two to three sets of clothes
    • Good pair of gloves
    • A way to store one to two liters of water
    • A way to purify water - tablets or a filter
    • A flashlight and batteries
    • Phone charger and cables
    • An extra credit card and cash
    • A liter or matches
    • Small first aid kit
    • A pack of important papers and copies of identification in a watertight bag
    • Multi-tool
    • Duct-tape
  • Car Bag

    • Same as Bug-out-bag, but for one to two days
    • Think of this bag as the bag you use to get home if you had to leave your vehicle and walk home
    • Include a pair of old sneakers or hiking boots
    • Extra map in a waterproof bag
    • Mole Skins
    • The long skinny single strap rectangular bags work well for cars and will usually fit under a seat
  • EDC Bag

    • Water bottle one litter to 1.5 litters
    • Emergency money back with a card and cash
    • Notepad with emergency contact numbers
    • Gloves
    • Handkerchief
    • A liter or matches
    • Small first-aid kit with lip balm and dental floss and Mole Skins
    • Small pack of wet wipes
    • Emergency sleeping bag - Mylar
    • Multi-tool
    • Backup battery and charging cables + USB car cigaret lighter adapter
    • Optional Items Aaron Mentions
      • Lock picks
      • Hearing protection (I’ve gotten to the range a few times and used mine)
      • Two extra pistol magazines
      • Signal Mirror
      • Extra locking blade knife

 

 

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~ Resources from this episode can be found at:

http://www.intherabbithole.com/e208

 

 

Feb 20, 2017

In this episode, we discuss making a little money through urban farming with your buddy Michael Jordan the Bee Whisperer. It’s not as hard as you may think.

Many of us in the preparedness community have small, medium, and even larger urban farms. They're perfect for building survival skills, building a food storage pantry, and becoming more self-reliant with an urban farm. And getting out and putting your hands in some dirt or raising animals can be relaxing.

But what do you do when you start producing excess. You may be sitting on extra cash or a side hustle and not even realize. You just have to like money and be willing to put in some effort.

A few years ago now, we had a very respectable urban farm with chickens and rabbits. When we got to 40 chickens and 40 rabbits we were producing more than we needed or wanted. We talked at length about selling the excess, but selling rabbit meat and eggs proved problematic due to local and federal laws. And we weren't sure where to start.

Urban Farming Topics Discussed

  • Being aware of laws in your area
  • What animals work well for urban farming
  • Different products from your urban farm you can sell
  • Some of the ways you can sell your products to make an income
  • How to get around health department laws regarding meet
  • How to hide bees, chickens, quail, and rabbits, so others do not know you have them
  • Why a dehydrator is an urban farmers friend
  • How using FREE Brewer's spent grain is your friend

Become a supporting member here:

http://www.itrh.net

Resources from this episode can be found at:

http://www.intherabbithole.com/e207

 

Feb 13, 2017

Gary Collins is back with more off grid shenanigans, misadventures, and advice. You'll get the ins and outs for when you're ready to build out that perfect bug out location.

Bug Out Locations and retreat cabins usually can't be grid tied due to their remote nature. And most preppers would rather their home away from home be self-sufficient should SHTF.

But going Off-grid isn't as easy as TV makes it look. There are lots of things to consider, building contractors aren't often well versed in the materials or techniques, and permitting can be a nightmare. And sourcing the building materials and alternative energy equipment isn't always as straightforward as one might think.

Fortunately, Garry shares his experiences, advice, do's and don'ts, and a whole lot more on what it takes to build an off-grid bug out retreat. He's got some much knowledge on the topic; he even wrote a book about it.

~ Off-Grid Home Topics Discussed:~

* Why someone would want to build an off-grid home
* Why every off-grid home project is different
* Finding water and drilling wells on a remote building site
* Balancing remote with convenient when considering rural and remote homes
* The hardest part of building a home note tied into the grid
* Dealing with bad building contractors
* How to find great building contractors
* What is ICF Brick and how do you build with it
* Using solar to power your home
* Incorporating wind turbines for electricity generation
* The hydro-electric bug out location consideration
* Why you probably won't be able to get all your electricity needs from one alternative power generation source
* How to set up security on a remote rural property
* Security cameras for bug out locations
* His book: Going Off the Grid

~ Become a supporting member here:

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~ Resources from this episode can be found at:

http://www.intherabbithole.com/206

Feb 6, 2017

In this episode, we sit down with Jeanna Cournoyer to discuss self-defense and firearms training. Jeanna is a bit like a female John Wick with a long resume of training in Krav Maga, firearms, and stress training. She also happens to be pretty damn cool.

We dive into reality based training. This is scenario based and "real-world" techniques for hand-to-hand combat situations. And we dive into the murky waters where one must transition from a fist fit to a gun fight. But first, we go into using body language and verbal commands in an attempt to keep things from becoming physical.

~ Self-defense Topics Discussed:

* What is Fear and Adrenal Stress Training?
* What's the difference between self-defense and martial arts?
* How did Jeanna get into Krav Maga?
* What advantages does Krav Maga have over other martial arts for Jeanna?
* Is there a difference between Krav Maga taught to civilians and what’s taught in the Israeli military?
* IS that because it focuses more on arresting techniques?
* What limitations are there when it comes to unarmed self-defense techniques?
* What are people's biggest aversions to taking a self-defense class?
* Are there things women, in particular, should consider when looking at self-defense training?
* Why have firearms played such a big role in Jeanna’s personal defense training?
* Why there is so much interest in women-only classes for women?
* Why do women gravitate towards women-only self-defense and firearms classes?
* What changes for Jeanna as an instructor, when she’s teaching women-only classes?
* What parts of firearms’ training do women wrestle with versus men?
* What aspects of firearms’ training do women tend to excel at over men?
* Are there calibers that just don’t work well for most women and calibers that do work well for most women?
* How has having a kid changed the way Jeanna keep firearms in the house?
* How does Jeanna deal with a situation where one-half of a couple is hesitant or strongly opposed to the idea of firearms in the home while the other is interested in it?

~ Become a supporting member here:

http://www.itrh.net

~ Resources from this episode can be found at:

http://www.intherabbithole.com/e205

Feb 4, 2017

In this episode, Aaron shares his thoughts on the state of the survival and preparedness community. You see, there's been much to do in recent months about a large downturn in the number of people engaged in being prepared. But there's also been a lot of press about liberals flocking to preparedness out of fear of President Trump.

So what's really going on? Are we in a downturn from a false sense of security or are we in an upturn from a likely false sense of doom?

The answer is... sort of both. But not really either.

We'll explain the State of Survival and Preparedness in 2017:

  • How learning to ride a motorcycle is a lot like becoming a prepper
  • News of conservatives giving up on being survivalists
  • News or liberals becoming survivalists
  • Prepping the smart way and keeping your shirt on
  • Nav Jim shares the history since the 1960s and questions the future of preparedness (phase plasma rifles and all)

~ Become a supporting member here:

http://www.itrh.net

~ Resources from this episode can be found at:

http://www.intherabbithole.com/e204

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